The Equifax Data Breach and the Apache Struts Vulnerability

Last week (9/7/2017), Equifax announced that on July 29 they discovered that an exploited web application vulnerability was being used to access a trove of consumer information for the previous 2 ½ months, until discovery.  Various news outlets, such as the New York Post are starting to report that the … Continue reading

Linux Hardening

From a compliance perspective, organizations need to have a hardening standard derived from an authoritative source with solid engineering-based reasons of why we depart from any of the recommendations.  Most organizations use the Center for Internet Security (CIS) Hardening Benchmarks because that choice is easy to defend.  The CIS benchmarks … Continue reading

Modify a line in wtmp – Linux Accounting

The /var/log/wtmp file in a Linux system contains data about past user logins.  An attacker may want to modify this file as one of the steps they take in covering their track.  One may also want to modify utmp or btmp as well.  This same technique can be used. The … Continue reading

Capture a spurious outbound connection with NETSTAT

Several years ago, I created a PowerShell script to create a log of outbound connections.  What if you need something quick and dirty and cannot use a script like that or external tools like Process Explorer, etc? Here is a batch script that runs in an infinite loop and catches … Continue reading

Timestamp bash_history with every command

When working on Linux it is often very helpful to review the commands that you have entered.  For example, you may want to paste some of the commands into a script or may want to recreate the steps to solve the problem you were working on. Here is how I … Continue reading

Has SHA-1 been hacked?

No, not exactly.  The SHA-1 hashing algorithm still does what it is supposed to do.  SHA-1 creates an unpredictable 20 byte “fingerprint” of the data input into the function, in this case a web server certificate.  It is the unpredictability of the output that makes cryptographic hash functions so useful.  … Continue reading

FIPS 140-2 in a Nutshell

  The US Federal Government requires that its agencies protect sensitive, but unclassified information using cryptographic modules that have been validated to Federal Information Processing (FIPS) Standard 140-2 “Security Requirements for Cryptographic Modules.”  This standard replaced its predecessor, FIPS 140-1.  In this context, the term “validated” means tested by accredited … Continue reading

The Trust-Value Equation

  “I must trust that the benefit that I gain from using your service exceeds the concerns (Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt) that I have about using it.” Benefit can be thought of as a ratio of utility to unfriendliness.  No matter how user-friendly an application is, if a customer gains … Continue reading

The Encryption Magic Bullet

This post is a response to a variety of discussions that I have had lately with a variety of customers, executives, salespeople, and even engineers that are working on security projects for a variety of companies.  Sometimes, it seems, that encryption is positioned as the “Magic Bullet” that will cure … Continue reading

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